theatlanticcities:

Citing safety concerns, Nepal’s sherpas cancel the 2014 climbing season.

[Associated Press]

Point Sherpas.

(via theatlantic)

pulitzerfieldnotes:

Wasteland.

Image and caption by Karim Chrobog, via Instagram. South Korea, 2014.

Forthcoming project reporting on wasted food—all 1.3 billion annual tons of it, according to the UN.

Award-winning director Karim’s debut film War Child chronicles the life story of Emmanuel Jal, a former South Sudanese child soldier who became an international hip-hop artist.

theatlantic:

My Students Don’t Know How To Have a Conversation

Recently I stood in front of my class, observing an all-too-familiar scene. Most of my students were covertly—or so they thought—pecking away at their smartphones under their desks, checking their Facebook feeds and texts.

As I called their attention, students’ heads slowly lifted, their eyes reluctantly glancing forward. I then cheerfully explained that their next project would practice a skill they all desperately needed: holding a conversation.

Several students looked perplexed. Others fidgeted in their seats, waiting for me to stop watching the class so they could return to their phones. Finally, one student raised his hand. “How is this going to work?” he asked. 

My junior English class had spent time researching different education issues. We had held whole-class discussions surrounding school reform issues and also practiced one-on-one discussions. Next, they would create podcasts in small groups, demonstrating their ability to communicate about the topics—the project represented a culminating assessment of their ability to speak about the issues in real time.

Even with plenty of practice, the task proved daunting to students. I watched trial runs of their podcasts frequently fall silent. Unless the student facilitator asked a question, most kids were unable to converse effectively. Instead of chiming in or following up on comments, they conducted rigid interviews. They shuffled papers and looked down at their hands. Some even reached for their phones—an automatic impulse and the last thing they should be doing.

Read more. [Image: Adam Fagen/Flickr]

I love you Atlantic.

wired:

nevver:

Voyager Tom Gauld

We’ve all been there.

chinadigitaltimes:

Photo: Rongjiang County, Guizhou Province, by Tsemdo Thar http://ift.tt/1jFNLAH

echographapp:

The New Balance Numeric team took a trip to Boston and New York and hit every rail and staircase imaginable.

(via vimeo)

thefreelioness:

The NYPD tried to start a hashtag outpouring of positive memories with their police force. 

If this were ever a bad idea, it was probably the worst idea for arguably the most corrupt police force in America. 

via Vice:

What the person running the Twitter account probably failed to realize is that most people’s interactions with the cops fall into a few categories:

1. You are talking to them to get help after you or someone you knew was robbed, beaten, murdered, or sexually assaulted.

2. You are getting arrested. 

3. You are getting beaten by the police.

In category 1, you are probably not going to be like, “Oh, let me take a selfie with you fine officers so I can remember this moment,” and the other two categories are not things that the NYPD would like people on social media talking about. Additionally, the people who use Twitter a lot (and who aren’t Sonic the Hedgehog roleplayers) are the type who love fucking with authority figures. In any case, #myNYPD quickly became a trending topic in the United States, largely because people were tweeting and retweeting horrific images of police brutality perpetrated by New York City cops.

That is all.

(via philthyasphuck)

I love you Kelly McGarry. #GoPr0

Chuskit

mrdjchina:

On the way back, the Eco Club picked up around 15 bags of trash along the road.  Awesome!

(via peacecorps)

(via togifs)

untappedcities:

Moving Murals: Henry Chalfant & Martha Cooper’s All-City Graffiti Archive on Exhibit at City Lore http://ift.tt/1l7m35j

asiasociety:

How China’s Security Commission Can Manage Crises By Learning from the Past

Matt Stumpf, Director of the Asia Society Policy Institute’s Washington office, proposes five practices to make the commission more effective.

Read the full story here.

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