Pause

Apr 23

[video]

theatlantic:

Study: Bullied Kids At Risk for Mental Health Problems 40 Years Later

Frequent and occasional bullying were both associated with a higher risk for depression, psychological distress, suicidal thoughts, and anxiety disorders in middle age.
Read more. [Image: spDuchamp/Flickr]

theatlantic:

Study: Bullied Kids At Risk for Mental Health Problems 40 Years Later

Frequent and occasional bullying were both associated with a higher risk for depression, psychological distress, suicidal thoughts, and anxiety disorders in middle age.

Read more. [Image: spDuchamp/Flickr]

theatlantic:

Study: Bullied Kids At Risk for Mental Health Problems 40 Years Later

Frequent and occasional bullying were both associated with a higher risk for depression, psychological distress, suicidal thoughts, and anxiety disorders in middle age.
Read more. [Image: spDuchamp/Flickr]

theatlantic:

Study: Bullied Kids At Risk for Mental Health Problems 40 Years Later

Frequent and occasional bullying were both associated with a higher risk for depression, psychological distress, suicidal thoughts, and anxiety disorders in middle age.

Read more. [Image: spDuchamp/Flickr]

[video]

FCC to propose new rules on net neutrality

breakingnews:

The New York TimesThe Federal Communications Commission is set to propose new rules that would allow content providers to pay Internet service providers for special access to customers. 

The new rules, set to be proposed Thursday, represent a turnaround on the subject of net neutrality. Internet companies would reportedly be able to negotiate separately and charge different amounts to content companies such as Netflix and Amazon for priority services.

Follow updates on BreakingNews.com.

pulitzerfieldnotes:

Laboratory at a primary health center in Bihar, India. Part of a series on India’s Hospital Crisis for the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting.

Image and caption by Sami Siva. India, 2014.
“In West Bengal, A Pilgrimage of the Sick,” by Michael Edison Hayden and Sami Siva for Roads and Kingdoms, April 2104.

On Thursday, April 24, join journalist Michael Hayden and Dr. Hanif Lakdawala, a doctor working in Gujarat, to discuss India’s healthcare crisis.
The event will be streamed live from the listing on our website. RSVP to receive an email 15 minutes before the start time.

pulitzerfieldnotes:

Laboratory at a primary health center in Bihar, India. Part of a series on India’s Hospital Crisis for the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting.

Image and caption by Sami Siva. India, 2014.

In West Bengal, A Pilgrimage of the Sick,” by Michael Edison Hayden and Sami Siva for Roads and Kingdoms, April 2104.

On Thursday, April 24, join journalist Michael Hayden and Dr. Hanif Lakdawala, a doctor working in Gujarat, to discuss India’s healthcare crisis.

The event will be streamed live from the listing on our website. RSVP to receive an email 15 minutes before the start time.

Apr 22

theatlanticcities:

Citing safety concerns, Nepal’s sherpas cancel the 2014 climbing season.
[Associated Press]


Point Sherpas.

theatlanticcities:

Citing safety concerns, Nepal’s sherpas cancel the 2014 climbing season.

[Associated Press]

Point Sherpas.

(via theatlantic)

pulitzerfieldnotes:

Wasteland.

Image and caption by Karim Chrobog, via Instagram. South Korea, 2014.
Forthcoming project reporting on wasted food—all 1.3 billion annual tons of it, according to the UN.
Award-winning director Karim’s debut film War Child chronicles the life story of Emmanuel Jal, a former South Sudanese child soldier who became an international hip-hop artist.

pulitzerfieldnotes:

Wasteland.

Image and caption by Karim Chrobog, via Instagram. South Korea, 2014.

Forthcoming project reporting on wasted food—all 1.3 billion annual tons of it, according to the UN.

Award-winning director Karim’s debut film War Child chronicles the life story of Emmanuel Jal, a former South Sudanese child soldier who became an international hip-hop artist.

theatlantic:

My Students Don’t Know How To Have a Conversation

Recently I stood in front of my class, observing an all-too-familiar scene. Most of my students were covertly—or so they thought—pecking away at their smartphones under their desks, checking their Facebook feeds and texts.
As I called their attention, students’ heads slowly lifted, their eyes reluctantly glancing forward. I then cheerfully explained that their next project would practice a skill they all desperately needed: holding a conversation.
Several students looked perplexed. Others fidgeted in their seats, waiting for me to stop watching the class so they could return to their phones. Finally, one student raised his hand. “How is this going to work?” he asked. 
My junior English class had spent time researching different education issues. We had held whole-class discussions surrounding school reform issues and also practiced one-on-one discussions. Next, they would create podcasts in small groups, demonstrating their ability to communicate about the topics—the project represented a culminating assessment of their ability to speak about the issues in real time.
Even with plenty of practice, the task proved daunting to students. I watched trial runs of their podcasts frequently fall silent. Unless the student facilitator asked a question, most kids were unable to converse effectively. Instead of chiming in or following up on comments, they conducted rigid interviews. They shuffled papers and looked down at their hands. Some even reached for their phones—an automatic impulse and the last thing they should be doing.
Read more. [Image: Adam Fagen/Flickr]


I love you Atlantic.

theatlantic:

My Students Don’t Know How To Have a Conversation

Recently I stood in front of my class, observing an all-too-familiar scene. Most of my students were covertly—or so they thought—pecking away at their smartphones under their desks, checking their Facebook feeds and texts.

As I called their attention, students’ heads slowly lifted, their eyes reluctantly glancing forward. I then cheerfully explained that their next project would practice a skill they all desperately needed: holding a conversation.

Several students looked perplexed. Others fidgeted in their seats, waiting for me to stop watching the class so they could return to their phones. Finally, one student raised his hand. “How is this going to work?” he asked. 

My junior English class had spent time researching different education issues. We had held whole-class discussions surrounding school reform issues and also practiced one-on-one discussions. Next, they would create podcasts in small groups, demonstrating their ability to communicate about the topics—the project represented a culminating assessment of their ability to speak about the issues in real time.

Even with plenty of practice, the task proved daunting to students. I watched trial runs of their podcasts frequently fall silent. Unless the student facilitator asked a question, most kids were unable to converse effectively. Instead of chiming in or following up on comments, they conducted rigid interviews. They shuffled papers and looked down at their hands. Some even reached for their phones—an automatic impulse and the last thing they should be doing.

Read more. [Image: Adam Fagen/Flickr]

I love you Atlantic.

wired:

nevver:

Voyager Tom Gauld

We’ve all been there.

wired:

nevver:

Voyager Tom Gauld

We’ve all been there.

chinadigitaltimes:

Photo: Rongjiang County, Guizhou Province, by Tsemdo Thar http://ift.tt/1jFNLAH

chinadigitaltimes:

Photo: Rongjiang County, Guizhou Province, by Tsemdo Thar http://ift.tt/1jFNLAH

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[video]

[video]

Apr 21

[video]